Can You Really Find True Love On Telly?

Adulthood is when we no longer relate our love lives to Disney but to reality TV dating shows.

Welcome to 2018, where finding the love of your life now seems to have no boundaries and has become socially acceptable to have the world weigh in while you do so.

Thanks to the likes of Tinder and online dating, society has become accustomed to the idea that if you can orchestrate it, you might as well film it.

With the rise of popular dating shows such as The Bachelor, Married at First Sight and Love Island, we no longer scoff at the idea of finding love on TV. In fact, hundreds of thousand of people regularly apply to be chosen for such shows in the hopes that maybe we will find our soul mate and enhance our profile along the way.

But can you really find true love on television or is it all just show business and a short-lived romance bubble with copious amounts of candles and roses?

After 12 years in the TV industry, I can confirm that what you see isn’t always what you get. Think of reality TV as another means of social media; most of the time things are edited, enhanced and captioned to create drama.

That being said, there is always an element of authenticity at the heart, because -- let’s face it -- we are all a sucker for a happy ever after ending.

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The motivation behind the majority of contestants on shows such as this season's The Bachelor is usually to find true love. Whether they actually do has nothing to do with the network, camera and length of their dress, but their own ability to be compatible and function as a healthy couple.

We assume that just because two people have been thrown together into ambient lighting and endless cheese platters and wine that they will connect and fall head over heels. But the only way to know if these couples are actually ‘for reals’ is apparent through time.

This one worked out just fine -- the pair married in June. Image: Getty

While original Bachie winners Tim Robards and Anna Heinrich have confirmed that love can start, flourish and lead to marriage from a single rose ceremony, we can’t help but cast cautious glances towards Sophie Monk and Stu Laundy -- but I mean, come on, we all saw that coming! *cough *

Dating shows have become our guilty pleasure, because secretly we love the idea that we can see real people find love in a setting that clearly is more focused on views rather than healthy relationships.

But let’s just put things into perspective, when you throw 25 contestants and one hot prize into a mansion, there will be tension, drama and a high possibility of several connections, simply because of the amount of expectations attached to the circumstances and the number of people involved.

After chatting to former contestants from previous seasons, the biggest thing they said about dating shows was that being caught in the love bubble makes you attach an over-sensationalised and romantic notion to love.

And that, my friends, is where the issues start.

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A lot of the contestants assume they have to find love with the only option in front of them. And so, they either force a connection or convince themselves that the infatuation they feel is indeed love.

So, needless to say, when real reality sets in and they step into the real world to function as mere mortals, everything looks and feels a little different. We forget that real love isn’t based on feelings and circumstances, but choices and actions. Hence why a lot of couples don’t last and the ones that do, such as Sam Wood and Snez, are two people who have found and fostered a genuine connection beyond the hype of TV.

I think it’s safe to say there is always a possibility of real love to be found on dating shows. But letting go of our great expectations of that happening means we can all relax and enjoy watching these shows while yelling our expert advice at the screen.

Feature image: Getty