The Best Films Of 2018 (So Far)

Seen anything good lately? We have.

We’re midway through the year, which means it’s time to catch up on the films people have been raving about. So far, 2018 has been kind to horror films, superhero blockbusters and love stories between a lady and fish monster.

The good news for you is that most of these films are available to buy or stream easily, or if you’re lucky, your local cinema might still have screenings available.

Buckle up for the best films of 2018 so far.

Cargo
(Image: Netflix/Facebook)

What’s it about?

Australia has been ravaged by a virus that turns people into flesh eating monsters. A dad (Martin Freeman) treks across the outback in hopes of finding a safe home for his infant daughter.

The verdict

The zombie has always been a political monster and it’s ferocious within the context of Australia. A paternal nightmare that doubles as a gut-wrenching survival film, but it’s so much more than evading the undead. Co-directors Yolanda Ramke and Ben Howling have made a stunning debut that’s a strong contender for the best Australian film of 2018.

The Shape of Water
(Image: Fox Searchlight/Facebook)

What’s it about?

A mute janitor (Sally Hawkins) working in a secret government facility develops a bond with a fish man (Doug Jones) who is enslaved for scientific research.

The verdict

Believe the hype about this one. The recent winner of Oscar Best Picture is the real deal. An adult fairy tale that’s also a lush throwback to old Hollywood. Ride the wave of cross species romance and a heartfelt message about acceptance.

Phantom Thread
(Image: Focus Features)

What’s it about?

In 1950s London, a famous fashion designer, Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day Lewis), starts a relationship with a waitress, Alma Elson (Vicky Krieps), and she becomes his muse.

The verdict

If you’ve ever been in a long-term relationship you have to see this film. Writer/director, Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, There Will Be Blood) examines the madness of monogamy through Reynolds and Alma’s wild relationship. The crazier it gets the more you realise they’re made for each other and their specific obsessive kinks. I love these sickos.

Black Panther
(Image: Marvel Studios/Facebook)

What’s it about?

A technologically advanced African nation, Wakanda, is hidden from the world and untouched by colonialism. King T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) is tasked with leading his people and keeping the country a secret as his alter-ego, Black Panther. When a conspiracy threatens to reveal Wakanda to the world, the Black Panther leaps into action.

The verdict

For once, Black Panther proves a Marvel film can aspire to be something more; it has political bite, emotional depth, ethical dilemmas, and regal jostling, but it still manages to maintain a bombastic comic book aesthetic that’s spectacular.

Annihilation
(Image: Netflix/Facebook)

What’s it about?

Based on the Jeff VanderMeer novel of the same name, a group of scientists are sent to investigate the mysterious ‘Area X’, a part of America undergoing dramatic environmental changes. The catch is that no one who enters Area X ever returns.

The verdict 

A spectacular work of science fiction that not only gets under your skin but it becomes part of it. A visceral journey into a mysterious landscape that’s lush with trippy visuals and an unnerving premise.

The Post
(Image: 20th Century Fox/Facebook)

What’s it about?

A historical drama about the fortnight in 1971 when reporters at The Washington Post and The New York Times dealt with The Pentagon Papers, a series of classified documents that detailed the US government lied about their involvement in the Vietnam War.

The verdict

Following Lincoln and Bridge of Spies, director, Steven Spielberg, completes his political trilogy with a thrilling look at the power of journalism. Don’t let the setting fool you, The Post isn’t stuck in the past, but more relevant than ever in the turbulent political news cycle of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Hereditary
Hereditary scariest film exorcist toni collette
(Image: A24)

What’s it about?

Annie Graham (Toni Collette) is grieving the passing of her mother when strange things start happening to her family that reveal dark secrets in the family tree.

The verdict

A horror film so great it made me want to take out a restraining order against its writer and director, Ari Aster. Hereditary does what all great horror movies do, it takes a part of you and replaces it with something jiggered that will stay with you long after the credits roll.