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Move Over Knickers, We Have A New Favourite Cow

He may be tiny, but he's melting some big hearts.

Lil' Bill is believed to be the world's smallest bull.

Born nearly a month premature, Lil' Bill weighed about 3.5 kilograms, nearly less than one-tenth of what a normal calf should weigh.

Image: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/ Tom Thompson

He was found in a pasture by a family who were well-experienced with cattle, but they soon realised his medical needs were far beyond their skills.

So they took him to Dr Gretchen Grissett and her team at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine in early November.

READ MORE: Knickers The Massive Steer Is Just A ‘Little Above The Norm’

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Image: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/ Tom Thompson

He was struggling to breathe because of underdeveloped lungs, and fitted with a feeding tube to help him gain weight.

“The calf’s owners really wanted us to save him, and I think they really wanted to keep him, but he was in really tough shape with a lot of respiratory issues when he came to us,” Grissett said.

He's come on in leaps and bounds since then, no longer needing oxygen therapy or his feeding tube.

Image: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/ Tom Thompson

But his legs are still in splints to help his joints develop.

“Right now, Lil’ Bill’s bones are not fully developed so we have his legs splinted to provide adequate support," Grissett said.

"Allowing too much activity on his joints could lead to long-term orthopedic issues for this little guy.”

His low birth weight makes Grissett believe he has a form of dwarfism, and extensive DNA tests have been ordered so vets can gain a clearer picture of his condition.

Dr Gretchen Grissett and Lil' Bill. Image: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/ Tom Thompson

Despite his serious medical issues, Grissett and her team believe Lil' Bill has a fighting chance at making a full recovery.

“I’m feeling much more confident that he will make it, but we definitely still have some hurdles to jump over for him to make a full recovery,” Grissett said.

“Other than sleeping a lot, which is normal for preemies, Lil’ Bill behaves much like most five-week old calves.”

Feature Image: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/ Tom Thompson