Fur Real! Rangers Track Man-Eating Tiger With Calvin Klein Cologne

Rangers hunting for a man-eating Tiger in central India have turned to an unusual but little-known secret in the tiger expert community to find him: Calvin Klein's Obsession cologne.

The female tiger is suspected of killing 13 people in the past six months, and as per The Independent, rangers have tried every other means possible to capture it: hundreds of foot patrols, tranquilizer darts, bulldozers, track marks, camera traps, a thermal imagery drone and even five Indian elephants, but to no avail.

The six-year-old tiger, given the name T1, has reportedly dragged away several villagers by the neck, causing panic.

Animal activists tried to prevent the killing of T1 and her two cubs, but the Supreme Court ruled in September that rangers should try to capture her, or kill her.

Given T1's appetite for human flesh, rangers are now looking at using Obsession to lure her in.

Calvin Klein's obsession is reportedly catnip for big cats.

Sunil Limaye told The Guardian that they're still deciding on whether or not to use the cologne, but it's certainly an option, and one that has been used to capture at least two other tigers in the past.

Spraying perfume on zoo exhibits is something of a trade secret among zoo keepers, the Wall Street Journal reported in 2010.

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It was the general curator at New York's Bronx Zoo, Pat Thomas, who first experimented with fragrances and big cats. He noted that his jaguars weren't too keen on Estee Lauder, Revlon or Nina Ricca, but Calvin Klein's Obsession kept them engaged for about eleven minutes.

“It’s a combination of this lickable vanilla heart married to this fresh green top note—it creates tension,” fragrance-designer Ann Gottlieb told The Wall Street Journal.

She added that the cologne has synthetic "animal" notes, such as civet, a musky substance secreted by the big cat of the same name that has a particular sexual appear.

"It sparks curiosity with humans, and apparently, animals."

Contact the author: abrucesmith@networkten.com.au

Lead photo: Getty