Search For Survivors Begins In The Philippines

Praying for miracles, rescuers seek signs of life after Philippine typhoon landslides.

Hopes of finding survivors in the rubble of a huge landslide in the Philippines faded on Monday as rescuers in a remote mountainous region struggled to reach dozens of people feared trapped, two days after a powerful typhoon struck.

Some 300 police, soldiers, firefighters and volunteers armed mostly with hand tools raced to remove rocks, mud, debris and drain water from collapsed buildings, hoping to find some signs of life after 13 bodies were pulled out.

Image: Reuters

The village of Ucab in the picturesque Cordillera region was hit by one of 50 landslides triggered by heavy rains brought by Typhoon Mangkhut, which tore across the northern tip of the Philippines early on Saturday, killing at least 54 people.

Only three people have been rescued in Ucab. Fifty-five were missing, six of them children. Many of the adults were in an abandoned bunkhouse, next to a chapel and home of a pastor and his family. The buildings were all crushed by earth and rocks.

“I am 99 percent sure the people there are dead,” said Victorio Palangdan, the municipal mayor. “We will continue until we get them all.”

Image: Reuters

Rescuers used bare hands to remove roofing, slabs of concrete and planks of wood, standing side-by-side, passing debris along a line to a pile 50 feet away.

The abandoned bunkhouse, owned by gold miner Benguet Corp, was near the site of a mine which was operating illegally, according to the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines.

The chamber, of which Benguet Corp is a member, said mining operators in Ucab had been repeatedly told to leave the area because of the threat of landslides.

Angered by the deaths from landslides that some government officials say are exacerbated by illegal mining, President Rodrigo Duterte on Monday reiterated his desire to “close all mining”.

Image: Reuters

His environment minister, Roy Cimatu, earlier ordered the stoppage of all small-scale mining in the Cordillera region, where landslides had killed 24 people.

“From what I see, this will take time. We are unaware how deep they were buried,” said Peter Negrido, who has been involved in numerous rescue missions during natural disasters.