Schoolkids Build Solar Lights For Overseas Students

"I’m very privileged that I get to give them a solar light and make a big difference in their world"

Australian charity Solar Buddy has enlisted the help of local school children to produce solar lights for underprivileged kids overseas.

The portable devices are sent to developing countries where kerosene lamps are still the main source of lighting in many homes.

Kerosene lamps emit toxic black carbon dioxide, which can be as dangerous as smoking two packets of cigarettes a day.

“It’s really hard for children to study under those lights because they’re constantly rubbing their eyes and coughing,” said Billie Murphy, an education liaison officer with Solar Buddy.

“Early research has shown that students who receive our Solar Buddy lights are actually studying up to 38 percent longer than they were previously."

The gadgets are assembled by school children in Australia and then sent overseas.

Almost 200 students from Narangba Valley State School north of Brisbane took part in the assembly program on Wednesday.

Ms Murphy says the aim is to teach young people about energy poverty.

“Hopefully, they will feel really proud of themselves for doing something good today and donating something to another child who will literally change their life,” she says.

“I’m very privileged that I get to give them a solar light and make a big difference in their world,” says year six student Natasha Stajdohar.

Since 2016, more than 40,000 lights have been distributed globally.