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'Apocalyptic' Sky Appears As Bushfire Warnings Downgraded Near Hobart

An out-of-control wilderness bushfire in Tasmania's southwest is still burning hours after it first threatened several tiny townships.

An out-of-control wilderness bushfire in Tasmania's southwest is still burning hours after it first threatened several tiny townships.

The Gell River fire, west of the Tasmanian capital, has burnt through almost 15,000 hectares of bush but no longer poses an immediate risk to residents, the fire services states.

A warning for Maydena, Tyenna, Mt Field, National Park, Bushy Park, Ellendale, Westerway and Fentonbury was downgraded to an advice warning on Friday evening.

John Youd, who owns Tyenna River Cottage, told AAP the sky above Tyenna was "red and angry" in the afternoon but there was some blue poking through.

Around 400 campers left Mount Field National Park after it was closed.

But residents are warned embers from the blaze, burning about 20km northwest of the communities, could fall and to enact their bushfire survival plans.

"We are not out of the woods. There is a significant fire risk," Tasmania Fire Service chief officer Chris Arnol told reporters on Friday.

"If we get in, these fires will still be difficult to fight in the conditions that we are confronting at the moment.

"The day is not over and neither is our fire season - we've got another two months to go and this could be a prelude to a much busier time."

Two fires accidentally started from a lawn mower and powerlines arcing out during the day.

Hobart hit 34 degrees on Friday but dropped to 24C in the afternoon, while Campania peaked at 40C before a cool change moved up the state's east coast.

"The cool change arrived probably an hour earlier than we were expecting in Hobart," Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Luke Johnston said.

Dry winds of up to 40km/h are expected in the east, with fire danger rated severe at the east coast, southeast, midlands and Upper Derwent Valley.

There's a chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon, bringing the risk of fires being sparked by lightning strikes.

"In these fire conditions, any fire will be difficult to control. We're urging the public to be vigilant and promptly report fires," Tasmania Fire Service deputy chief officer Bruce Byatt said.

Byatt urged property owners to review their bushfire action plans.

A total fire ban has been declared for the eastern half of the state, including Launceston, the central highlands, southern midlands and Hobart and surrounding areas.

Extra firefighters and equipment are on standby, with the east coast, southeast, midlands and Upper Derwent Valley rated a severe fire risk.

The mercury is likely to peak around 2pm, before an afternoon cool change brings relief to Hobart and sweeps up the east coast.

Friday is the sixth anniversary of the Dunalley bushfires that destroyed hundreds of homes in the state's southeast.

Popular national park tracks at Mt Field, Freycinet and Maria Island have been closed due to the extreme heat.