Science Reveals Why We Stay In Miserable Relationships

Til' death do us part? Meh, guess so.

We'll leave it up to comedian, Daniel Sloss, to set the scene for us.

The Scottish funnyman has become a worldwide sensation after revealing his joke was the cause behind 4,500 breakups.

Here it is: "All I'm asking is, have you ever been in a situation like that in a relationship where you felt trapped, like you couldn't get out of it, and it was just easier to stay in it?"

Well, have you?

Science revealed that those who decide to stay in bad relationships do so because they don't want to harm the other person. Source: Getty

If the answer is YES then you're an incredibly kind person ... according to science.  A new study from the University of Utah has revealed that those who decide to stay in bad relationships do so because they don't want to harm the other person.

The author of the study, Samantha Joel, described the decision to stay in a relationship that is making you miserable as a selfless act.

She explained to the New York Post  that: “Even if I don’t have a lot of self-interested reasons to stay -- maybe I’m not that invested in the relationship anymore and maybe my alternative (dating) options are good, I might think that if my partner is dependent on the relationship and would be devastated if we broke up, that might make me stay in the relationship.”

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The author behind the study said that: "The more dependent people believed their partner was on the relationship, the less likely they were to initiate a breakup." Source: Getty

Researchers interviewed 500 people who were in new relationships (they'd been dating for about two years) but who were thinking about breaking up.

Over the course of two months they were asked why they didn't just call it quits. As it turns out, those in relationships who felt their partner was more invested in them simply didn't have the heart to end it.

"The more dependent people believed their partner was on the relationship, the less likely they were to initiate a breakup," Joel wrote in a press release.

But Joel said the findings beg the question: "Who wants a partner who doesn't really want to be in the relationship?"

Feature Image: Getty