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This Is Not A Drill -- A Woman Has Woken Up Unable To Hear Men's Voices

It sounds unbelievable but a rare condition called Low-Frequency Hearing Loss cuts off deeper sounds. Like men.

According to Newsweek the woman, only identified as Ms. Chen, told doctors she went to bed after feeling nauseated, vomiting and experiencing ringing in her ears. When she woke up, she couldn’t hear her boyfriend’s voice.

Like, not at all.

She rushed to a hospital in the city of Xiamen, on the east coast of China,  and saw ear, nose, and throat specialist Dr Lin Xiaoqing.

The doctor examined her and said Chen was able to hear her, but couldn’t hear a male patient who spoke to her as well.

"She was able to hear me when I spoke to her, but when a young male patient walked in, she couldn't hear him at all,"' said Dr Xiaoqing.

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Image: AsiaWire

The doctors believe the condition -- called reverse-slope hearing loss, or low-frequency hearing loss -- was brought on by stress, as Ms Chen had been working late under stressful conditions and wasn't getting enough sleep before her hearing suddenly deteriorated.

And while for many people reading this, the idea of not hearing men talk is quite appealing -- think politics, husbands etc -- the condition itself can be quite serious.

READ MORE: Eleven-Year-Old Girl Breaks Down In Tears After Hearing Clearly For The First Time

If you haven't heard of it (and we hadn't either) it's called reverse-sloping hearing loss because of the shape of a hearing test audiogram of those who can’t hear low frequencies -- it looks the opposite of a ski slope, starting in the lower-left-hand corner and sloping upward steeply. It can be caused by inner ear hair cells getting damaged.

Anyone who suffers from low-frequency hearing loss, generally, can't hear noises that have a frequency of 2,000 Hz or below.

High-frequency hearing loss is much more common and generally means people struggle to, or can't hear the voices of women and children.

As well as struggling to hear low-frequency voices, those with the condition can find it hard to hear voices on the phone properly, as well as low noises like the hum of the fridge or thunder. This can put them in danger, as they may not hear low noises like oncoming cars.

Luckily, Dr. Xiaoqing said Ms. Chen is expected to make a full recovery with some rest.

 Feature Image: Getty