Chrissy Teigen's Adorable Son Gets Fitted With Helmet For 'Flat Head Syndrome'

The condition -- known as Plagiocephaly -- has become more common in recent years.

Chrissy Teigen's son Miles has been fitted with a helmet to correct his “adorable slightly misshapen head", she tweeted on Monday.

The mother-of-two explained the headgear as she shared selfies with the infant cradled in her arms.

“Baby Miles getting fitted for a little helmet today for his adorable slightly misshapen head,” she wrote.

READ MORE: Babies Developing 'Flat Heads' At Alarming Rate

READ MORE: We've Been Saying Chrissy Teigen's Name Wrong The Whole Time

“So if you see pictures, don’t feel bad for him because he’s just fixing his flat and honestly he’s probably gonna be even cuter with it somehow."

The popular model/host/author jokingly added: "I have been told it’s too late for my head."

The post garnered support from Chrissy's 10 million followers, who shared their experiences with Plagiocephaly (or 'Flat Head Syndrome').

The condition is caused by prolonged pressure on a baby’s growing skull, flattening the back of the head.

The disorder has become more common recently, as Red Nose recommends sleeping babies on their back to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Sydney parent Elisabete Gomes told 10 daily her son Brenden, 14, was two years old when he was diagnosed with torticollis -- a related condition where the neck muscles contract, causing the head to twist to one side -- and instructed to wear a helmet.

"It was very stressful as he didn’t tolerate it well, to the point where he got too clever and would go to the edge of the coffee table and try to push the helmet off," she described.

Flat Head Syndrome has become more common recently, as Red Nose recommends sleeping babies on their back to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Image: Daniel Karmann/picture alliance via Getty.

Her son wore the helmet for 18 months and while it helped add pressure to the 'good' side of his head (to adjust the flat side) it was a difficult time for the then toddler.

"It was uncomfortable and worked best when he wore it to sleep," she recalled.

"Being sweaty, it also created pressure sores on his head."

Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital sees about 1,330 babies a year with Flat Head Syndrome, with a two-month waiting list for treatment.

Babies treated at the hospital's plagiocephaly clinic are, on average, seven months old.

Doctors have produced a 'fact sheet' due to the condition's growing case rate with advice on sleeping practices and the importance of "tummy time".

Featured image: Chrissy Teigen, Twitter.