'Porn Has A Lot To Answer For': Dolly Doctor's #1 Question About Pubic Hair Sparks Debate

Almost every Australian teen who grew up between 1995 and 2016 remembers Dolly Doctor, the help section in the pages of beloved and now-departed Dolly Magazine.

When the mag shut two years ago, it was at last revealed that Dolly Doctor was not an amalgamation of the editorial staff but a single person (and a real doctor): Dr. Melissa Kang.

Dr Melissa Kang answered the questions of teen girls and boys for 23 years. Photo: UTS.

For many young women growing up, she was their first (and for some their only) point of call when it came to traversing the sometimes tricky (and embarrassing) elements associated with growing up.

In a recent profile on Dr Kang completed by the ABC, she revealed that (perhaps unsurprisingly) some of the most common questions she was sent revolved around around genitals and pubic hair.

"Things around puberty and the preoccupation about whether you're attractive or not, those kinds of things stayed the same. The thing I really noticed was that pubic hair completely disappears over 23 years," she told the ABC.

"What concerned me about that was a lot of girls saying, 'Well, I've got to get rid of my pubic hair because I won't be attractive to my hypothetical boyfriend.' Often they were hypothetical, and that was really curious for me."

Dolly Magazine, which launched the career of Miranda Kerr, closed up shop in 2016 after 46 years in print. Photo: Dolly.

She said that young girls -- and presumably, teens with vaginas who were exploring their gender identity -- worried that their genitals weren't attractive enough, in the same way that girls previously worried about their height or hair.

On Monday morning Studio 10 turned the spotlight on Dr Kang's profile -- with  host Sarah Harris lamenting at the revelation that the removal of public hair was the number one question asked by young girls.

"Doesn't that make you so depressed,"  Harris asked her fellow co-hosts, which included guest host Leigh Sales.

"There's a whole generation of women growing up thinking that's wrong. I hope we embrace the bush again," Harris said.

The mother-of-two young boys went on to say that she believed "pornography has a lot to answer for".

"A lot of young women and men who are seeing this completely outrageous view of what sex is. There are women having labiaplasty at 20 [years of age]," she said.

READ MORE: Girls As Young As 11 Seeking Genital Cosmetic Surgery

Fellow co-host Kerri-Anne Kennerly added that the procedure is now "one of the most common ... apart from boob jobs."

But it was up to resident comedian Denise Scott to deliver the clanger, telling her fellow co-hosts that girls "should keep their hair and then they wouldn't need a labiaplasty because it'd be covered."

Contact the author: abrucesmith@networkten.com.au

Photo: Dolly Magazine